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Note: This is a re-post from Thoughts On Being an older blog of mine.

Well maybe you don’t have to change your relationship with food…

but a lot of people are looking endlessly for the quick fix to change their affinity for food. Why else would the “diet” industry have Americans spending 40 billion a year on weight loss products and programs? 40 billion dollars. The Diet Industry: A Big Fat Lie

Having spent over 12 years in my own health food stores listening to the general public’s needs and desires I can tell you this; they are sick and tired of being whatever weight they are (not everyone looking to lose weight is overweight) and they want it to change right now.

I call it the silver bullet mentality- actually the natural silver bullet mentality. Many of the customers looking for a fix in the health food store would never dream of taking a pharmaceutical even over the counter silver bullet, they want the natural one right now!

My point is the public still after all these years wants a quick fix to be in swimsuit shape . Obviously, they are spending those hard earned 40 billion dollars a year chasing after the same thing they chased and never caught the year before.

What is this, dare I call it an addiction to the quick fix, perfect, hard, non aging body? How did we get here? Where are we going?

Mindful Eating Group

Mindful Eating Groups Begin!

If you feel your current way of eating is restrictive, obsessive or unsustainable – if you feel guilty or disappointed around food come…

join us for a weekly mindful eating group and see how awareness can change your relationship with food to a peaceful and more compassionate perspective enhancing your health and life!

Cost for either Online or Spreckelsville, Maui location is $15.00/week

Online Mindful Eating Group conference call:

Tuesdays 12:30 to 2:00pm Hawaii Time (3:30 to 5pm Pacific Time, 4:30 to 6pm Mountain Time, 5:30 to 7pm Central Time, 6:30 to 8pm Eastern Time)

Begins August 3rd                           SIGN UP NOW!

Conference call phone number and instructions will be emailed when payment is received. Mahalo!

Maui Mindful Eating Group in Spreckelsville:

Wednesdays 6:30 – 8:00 pm

Begins August 4th                           SIGN UP NOW!


Call 315-729-5442

For Info and Directions

The above sessions are drop in groups…dedicated focus groups and private sessions are also available. Please ask.

Mindbody@msn.com or call 315-729-5442

Aloha!

With the DSMs fifth edition due out in 2013 there will be a new addition to the eating disorder diagnosis. Binge Eating.

This disorder has long been the most common eating disorder yet is hard to identify and even more difficult to treat. Those with Binge Eating disorder have been under the Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) for diagnosis and  have still been able to receive treatment. I wonder if the new classification will help to identify people a little easier and get them treatment quicker. The longer one runs on with an untreated ED the more difficult it becomes to treat. I hope this will be a benefit to the client for better quicker treatment.

What differentiates the Binge Eating episode from an overeating episode?

The binge eater will eat the equivalent of 2 sizable meals (consider someone ordering 2 super-sized fast food meals to eat quickly in one sitting) in one sitting AND the binge eater feels they have lost control and cannot stop eating. The overeating episode usually simply ends when the eater feels over full while the binge eater will continue in the presence of physical discomfort.

The binge eater will also do this behavior often once a week or more and it has been going on for over 3 months. The pattern often stems from running to food to soothe difficulties as an alcoholic would go to the bottle.

Yet we cannot live without food….we see how difficult it is to live without drugs or alcohol in this culture. Just imagine the binge eater with his drug of choice available and needed to stay alive. This is one of EDs challenges no matter which disorder you are battling.

Binge Eating Disorder and Compulsive overeating show great success in the the client learning to control their eating and behavior patterns. Using education in Mindful eating techniques and generally learning to treat food as food can bring relief to many binge eaters and compulsive over-eaters with additional cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for those who have been diagnosed with Binge Eating Disorder.

Binge eating recommended as a

psychiatric diagnosis; obesity is not

See the story from CNN Health here: http://bit.ly/9Ghym4

I have decided to give you Gary himself to explain his book and his findings.

With this video and slide show of Gary Taubes giving his talk to Medical Grand Rounds at Dartmouth 6/5/09 you will learn more than you can imagine. Listen to it a number of times if you are concerned about  sugar and carbohydrates in your diet. Listen again if you have diabetes, high cholesterol or heart disease.

Gary Taubes Good Calories Bad Calories presentation at Dartmouth Medical Grand Rounds 6/5/09

Keep the 11 conclusions I list below  in mind as you listen  to or watch his presentation to this group of doctors.

1. Dietary fat, whether saturated or not, does not cause heart disease. (click here to read)
2. Carbohydrates do, because of their effect on the hormone insulin. The more easily-digestible and refined the carbohydrates and the more fructose they contain, the greater the effect on our health, weight, and well-being.(click here to read)
3. Sugars—sucrose (table sugar) and high fructose corn syrup specifically—are particularly harmful. The glucose in these sugars raises insulin levels; the fructose they contain overloads the liver.
4. Refined carbohydrates, starches, and sugars are also the most likely dietary causes of cancer, Alzheimer’s Disease, and the other common chronic diseases of modern times.
5. Obesity is a disorder of excess fat accumulation, not overeating and not sedentary behavior.
6. Consuming excess calories does not cause us to grow fatter any more than it causes a child to grow taller.
7. Exercise does not make us lose excess fat; it makes us hungry.
8. We get fat because of an imbalance—a disequilibrium—in the hormonal regulation of fat tissue and fat metabolism. More fat is stored in the fat tissue than is mobilized and used for fuel. We become leaner when the hormonal regulation of the fat tissue reverses this imbalance.
9. Insulin is the primary regulator of fat storage. When insulin levels are elevated, we stockpile calories as fat. When insulin levels fall, we release fat from our fat tissue and burn it for fuel.
10. By stimulating insulin secretion, carbohydrates make us fat and ultimately cause obesity. By driving fat accumulation, carbohydrates also increase hunger and decrease the amount of energy we expend in metabolism and physical activity.
11. The fewer carbohydrates we eat, the leaner we will be.

Comments are always welcome!

Carbohydrates do, because of their effect on the hormone insulin. The more easily-digestible and refined the carbohydrates and the more fructose they contain, the greater the effect on our health, weight, and well-being.

Conclusion number 2 says a lot. This was pretty much spelled out in the Atkins diet but with out the scientific research and scope that Gary Taubes has presented in his book Good Calories Bad Calories. This association with Atkins causes many to stand back from the lower carb way of eating and is keeping healthful information away from the general population. Lowering our carbohydrate intake is not to be feared (unless you work for a cereal or soda manufacturer). Lower carbohydrate eating can be a blessing to anyone and especially for those with any of the diseases listed here(Click Here For List )

I recommend you check out this list of diseases/conditions that some researchers believe may be caused/exacerbated by eating carbohydrates that Adam has put together on why-low-carb-diets-work.com, it’s surprising to many!

The easiest way for me to grab your attention on conclusion number 2  is to have you experiment with your own body. If you have not yet looked at the carbohydrates in you diet and how they work in your body this is a perfect opportunity! Ready to make a change?

Let’s start with cutting out the most obvious and working our way from there:

  1. Sugar, all forms of added sugar (white, brown, turbinado, agave, honey, molasses, maple syrup, fructose, etc) and all the products that contain these sugars (canned and bottled drinks including sports and health drinks and  most packaged and boxed foods)
  2. Fruit juices (bottled and out of your home juicer)
  3. Easily digestible and refined carbohydrates (broken grains or flours as in breads, baked goods, pasta)
  4. Whole Grains (first corn then wheat then rice and down the line) See how these may even be depressing you here (Click Here for Link)

Starting with number 1 eliminate the easily-digestible and refined the carbohydrates

  • Keep track of how you feel (write down your energy level and physical state before you start it’s easy to forget left to memory and write daily any changes you feel- do this for a week
  • Move down the list after the first week and again keep track of how you feel and what if anything is changing (weight, BP readings, BG readings these are great measures of changes in the body)
  • After a month you will have a good look at how these easily digestible and refined carbohydrates are affecting YOUR body and if the grains themselves have an impact

Beyond theory, research and studies what matters most is how YOU feel and how your body responds to a different level of easily-digestible and refined carbohydrates. Do your own personal study and please share your experiences with us in the comments below!

PS…this just in “Don’t blame it on the burgers”. May 11,2010 The Independent

Dietary fat, whether saturated or not, does not cause heart disease.

The first of the 11 Critical Conclusions of Good Calories, Bad Calories from Gary Taubes’ book .

  • Taubes reveals the myth that dietary fat and especially saturated fat cause disease and obesity. This myth gained momentum when; infectious diseases had been conquered, and more people were living long enough to get diseases such as heart disease -along with new diagnosis technology and increased attention all happening post WWII.
  • Taubes also uncovers the myth that the American diet has shifted away from plant based foods to animal foods (high in saturated fat), he show that Americans have traditionally been big meat-eaters.
  • The myth that the fat eaten (especially the saturated fat and cholesterol) clogs the arteries is cleared up with the history of the cholesterol hypothesis, how it lives on today and why.
  • Gary show that there is no link between cholesterol levels and clogged arteries, how many get heart disease even with low cholesterol and many with high cholesterol levels never get the disease.
  • Much attention is paid to Ancel Keys who was the driving force behind the fat-cholesterol hypothesis. Keys believed that dietary fat raises cholesterol and causes heart disease and here is where the low-fat diet dogma was born, which developed into the low-fat-and-low saturated fat version.
  • What happens then is a confirmation bias; only looking at supporting evidence; much contradicting evidence is dismissed.
  • For example; The Framingham Heart Study did not support Keys’ hypothesis; NIH funders refused to allow publication of the results.
  • Virtually every study comparing diet, cholesterol, and heart disease within a single population failed to support the hypothesis.

And yet we continue to be told;

Dietary fat causes heart disease.

  • 1977 -the first time ever that a government institution had taken a stance on dietary fat—turned it from a scientific into a political issue when Senator George McGovern announced the publication of Dietary Goals for the United States  recommending caloric proportions of 55-60% carb, 30% fat with no more than a third of that saturated.

With the government on board and researchers going where the research money is not to mention Rose’s philosophy of picking a hypothesis early on and sticking to it no matter what, the truth was getting harder and harder to find.

Thankfully there are other countries with research and much ignored research in the US that with a little digging makes clear that

Dietary fat, whether saturated or not, does not cause heart disease.

So with studies showing that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease why do we get heart disease and clogged arteries?

The answer lies in the second Critical Conclusion:

Carbohydrates do (cause heart disease), because of their effect on the hormone insulin. The more easily-digestible and refined the carbohydrates and the more fructose they contain, the greater the effect on our health, weight, and well-being.

This critical conclusion will be posted next.

Check back or subscribe by RSS or Email subscription.

Leave your thoughts and questions below!

Aloha!

Today is the very first Book Review Podcast and I am happy to have the honor of first go to Gary Taubes and his book titled Good Calories Bad Calories.

This book has changed the landscape of nutrition and it’s about time!

Many have struggled to speak and it has taken a long time but now, I believe the time is ripe and the information will be not only heard but understood. Mahalo Gary Taubes for all you have done.

Below is the player with the podcast!

Join me in the future as I journey through (as stated by Random House) the 11 Critical Conclusions of Good Calories, Bad Calories. I’ll post on each one individually so check back or subscribe by RSS or Email.

They are as follows:

1. Dietary fat, whether saturated or not, does not cause heart disease. (click here to read)
2. Carbohydrates do, because of their effect on the hormone insulin. The more easily-digestible and refined the carbohydrates and the more fructose they contain, the greater the effect on our health, weight, and well-being.(click here to read)
3. Sugars—sucrose (table sugar) and high fructose corn syrup specifically—are particularly harmful. The glucose in these sugars raises insulin levels; the fructose they contain overloads the liver.
4. Refined carbohydrates, starches, and sugars are also the most likely dietary causes of cancer, Alzheimer’s Disease, and the other common chronic diseases of modern times.
5. Obesity is a disorder of excess fat accumulation, not overeating and not sedentary behavior.
6. Consuming excess calories does not cause us to grow fatter any more than it causes a child to grow taller.
7. Exercise does not make us lose excess fat; it makes us hungry.
8. We get fat because of an imbalance—a disequilibrium—in the hormonal regulation of fat tissue and fat metabolism. More fat is stored in the fat tissue than is mobilized and used for fuel. We become leaner when the hormonal regulation of the fat tissue reverses this imbalance.
9. Insulin is the primary regulator of fat storage. When insulin levels are elevated, we stockpile calories as fat. When insulin levels fall, we release fat from our fat tissue and burn it for fuel.
10. By stimulating insulin secretion, carbohydrates make us fat and ultimately cause obesity. By driving fat accumulation, carbohydrates also increase hunger and decrease the amount of energy we expend in metabolism and physical activity.
11. The fewer carbohydrates we eat, the leaner we will be.

Click the link below to see Gary Taubes :

What if it’s all Been a Big Fat Lie?

Dr. Weil Endorses Gary Taubes’ Good Calories, Bad Calories


Please join in and leave me your comments for discussion…a hearty discussion! Be well and much Aloha!

The Diet Within

Ever wondered what diet you should be following for your best health? I am asked this over and over and well, yes over again. The answer is totally within. I know that is not what you wanted to hear. Too vague, too woo-woo you say. Well if you are going to wait for your optimum food plan or “diet ” to be written by an alleged expert and published you will:

  1. Wait a long time                                                                   
  2. Be very disappointed

For all the different people I have seen and counseled I have seen very few who could be given a cookie cutter plan to follow for a nourishing life. The actual juice in making dietary and life changes is in the self discovery of what the body will and won’t respond to. Even when I look at all the anorexic clients, each one had to experiment, try, fail, try something new, and find the way on their own. The same goes for the over-eaters and the ortherexics, and the flat out don’t want to eat different folks who were sent to me by their physicians. Each person had to look at what I presented to be a healthy way of putting food together for nourishment and joy and make their own mark on it. Without this self branding the diet or food plan becomes someone else’s life or idea and there is no identification with it.

Do I have thoughts and plans that I know work and will bring health and happiness to the client? Yes. Do I see clients make choices I would rather they eliminate for quicker and fuller recovery? Yes. And I also know any plan without ownership by the client is doomed to fail. One step at a time, fully embracing the change with confidence and expectation is how big dietary and life style change are made to last.

Next time you think you have been disappointed by yet another diet or plan or theory, just remember you are another step closer to refining your way. You now know another way that your body does not respond to, you have more data, more information. This is where the food journal comes into play.

This week why not jot down your foods and what they’re  feeling like in your body. Next post we can get into more detail on how to organize this journal but for now try to get into the habit of writing out your daily food and how you feel.

Be well and be sure to comment below!

Omega Oils and Healthy Skin

Omega Oils and Healthy Skin

We have learned that from all the oils (dietary fats) we consume, the omegas specifically are great for our health and the skin in particular- this post is a look at the omega oils and the role they play .

What are the skin conditions most helped by omega 3 oils?

  • acne; it is an inflammatory disease with omega 6 to 3 ratio playing a huge role Acne: Omega-6 Fat Worsens Skin Inflammation
  • photo dermatitis; an abnormal skin reaction to sunlight, or more specifically to ultraviolet (UV) rays
  • psoriasis; a chronic, non-infectious disease that affects mainly the skin, currently suspected to be autoimmune in origin
  • dry skin; lack of oils pointing to the need for more omega 3
  • premature wrinkles; omega 3 lessens free radical damage
  • dandruff; one of the symptoms of omega 3 fatty acid deficiency is dandruff
  • cracked skin; again another sign of omega 3 deficiency
  • protects against the breakdown of skin collagen
  • maintains skin elasticity and tone
  • protects skin against ultraviolet-induced (UV) damage

Other conditions benefiting from omega 3 oils

  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • Osteoporosis
  • Depression
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Schizophrenia
  • Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • Asthma
  • Menstrual pain
  • Colon cancer
  • Breast cancer
  • Prostate cancer
  • Macular Degeneration

So  what are the “omegas”?

Omega 3 and 6 are the essential omegas, omega 9 can be made in the body from unsaturated fats and is therefor not considered essential. These omega oils make hormones in our bodies.

  • Omega 3 are are a family of unsaturated fatty acids that have in common a final carbon–carbon double bond in the n-3 position; that is, the third bond from the methyl end of the fatty acid.
  • Omega 6 are a family of unsaturated fatty acids that have in common a final carbon–carbon double bond in the n-6 position, that is, the sixth bond, counting from the end opposite the carboxyl group.

The FDA does not have an RDA for dietary fats. Eating cold water fish (oily fish) 2-3 times a week and reducing the omega 6s in your diet should be a great start to a balanced omega 6 to omega 3 ratio.

Where do we find the best food source of the omega 3s ?

The best way to have the omega 3s in the diet is by eating foods that have naturally occurring omega 3, this list includes:

  • fish; salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies and sardines having the highest value as they generally have 7 times more omega 3 than omega 6. Tuna also contains omega 3 but not in as desirable ratio.
  • eggs; chickens fed a diet of greens and insects produce higher levels of n−3 fatty acids (mostly ALA) than chickens fed corn or soybeans
  • meat; the n−6 to n−3 ratio of grass-fed beef is about 2:1, making it a more useful source of n−3 than grain-fed beef, which usually has a ratio of 4:1
  • milk and cheese
  • nuts with walnuts as the first choice for omega 3 concentration
  • seeds such as hemp, chia, flax. Caution: use seed oils sparingly as they are high in lectins which have been proven to cause leptin resistance (leptin acts as a signal to the brain to inhibit food intake) causing excessive weight gain and a host of other health related issues. Seed oils are concentrated in lectins and may be easily over consumed.

How do we eliminate the omega 6s so our ratio is more naturally balanced?

Omega 6s can be eliminated in my opinion by complete avoidance of mechanically extracted vegetable oils high in O-6. With four major food oils (palm, soybean, canola (rapeseed), and sunflower) providing more than 100 million tons annually, meaning more than 32 million tons of omega-6 (linoleic acid) and only 4 million tons of omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid), avoiding these (omega 6s) first and foremost is an excellent start.

If the balance cannot occur in your diet due to inability to or unwillingness to restrict the over abundant omega 6 containing foods (oils) you may very well need to supplement your diet with a fish oil. My first choice is the old stand by of cod liver oil. Look for a company who you can trust and has a history of pure products as fish oils vary on the market with some containing toxins from extraction.

Clever spoof on Rick Mercer’s popular ‘Rick’s Rant’. Dave sounds off about the Omega-6 (trans-fat) epidemic that has overrun North American diets. In an effort to make people conscious as to the deadly effects of their eating habits and the ‘low-fat’ craze that has created a nation of obese and unhealthy individuals. It’s time to wake up from our apathetic slumber and reach for the Omega-3’s in place of the Omega-6’s.

The Definitive Guide to Oils (Thank you Mark Sisson)

This section is quoted directly from Marks Daily Apple
I have highlighted the omega 3s

Canola

“Canola oil comes from rapeseed, a completely unpalatable seed rich in erucic acid, which is bitter and rather toxic. Canola oil is rapeseed oil stripped of erucic acid, … It gets a lot of attention from doctors as a “heart healthy” oil (one of the “good” fats) rich in omega-3s, but the fact that canola processing generally uses upwards of 500 degrees means a good portion of the Omega-3s could be rancid on the shelf.

61% MUFA
21% Omega-6 PUFA
9-11% Omega-3 PUFA
7% SFA

Flax Seed

…People generally use flax oil as an Omega-3 supplement, rather than for cooking – and this is a good choice, seeing as how flax is almost entirely made of PUFAs, which are prone to rancidity and oxidation when exposed to heat. Meat eaters, though, would be better off just taking fish oil. The DHA and EPA in fish oil are far more useful than the ALA in flax seed oil. Strict vegetarians, have at it – just don’t use flax seed oil to sautee your tofu.

19% MUFA
24% Omega-6 PUFA
47% Omega-3 PUFA (from ALA)
8-9% SFA

Corn

Corn oil boggles my mind. I can’t wrap my head around how extracting gallons upon gallons of liquid oil from a lowly corncob is actually possible. How isn’t it too much work for the payoff? …

24% MUFA
59% PUFA (mostly O-6)
13% SFA

Olive (and variations)

…It’s a delicious salad oil, a decent sautéing oil, and it can even be used as moisturizer and shaving lotion. …

73% MUFA
3.5-21% Omega-6 PUFA
1% Omega-3 PUFA (not even worth mentioning, really)
14% SFA

Coconut

MDA’s darling, coconut oil is truly a star…  it’s a tasty, shelf-stable (no hydrogenation required) tropical oil with a ton of saturated fatty acids. In fact, it’s almost purely saturated, which is why most doctors and nutritionists will probably advise against its consumption. …

6.2% MUFA
1.6% PUFA
92.1% SFA

Palm

Palm oil is controversial; .. Many palm oil plantations encroach upon the rapidly dwindling natural habitats of the orangutan, which are already in short supply in this world. The consensus seems to be that sustainable palm oil, especially the more complex, nutritious unrefined red palm oil, can be found. You’ve just got to look a little harder at the labels. West African red palm oil, for example, is considered to be pretty safe environmentally. Oh, and palm oil is also highly saturated and heat stable. Red palm oil is also stable, but it deserves special mention for its nutrient density – lots of CoQ10, Vitamin E, and SFAs.

39% MUFA
11% PUFA
50% SFA

Fish

Fish oil is another one of the widely accepted “good” fats. .. The Omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, are unequivocally beneficial to us. They help balance our O6-O3 ratios (to a more appropriate, pre-agricultural level), while they also promote proper cell function, good lipid numbers, and improved insulin sensitivity. ..

EPA and DHA levels vary by brand and type of fish. Check the label for yourself, or look at this handy table if you’re getting your fish oil from actual seafood.

Avocado

..Its fatty acid profile is similar to that of olive oil, but it has an even higher smoke point, making it a decent choice for cooking. .. Buy in dark bottles to minimize oxidation.

70% MUFA
12% Omega-6 PUFA
1% Omega-3 PUFA
12% SFA

Walnut

Walnut oil is one of the better tasting nut oils. It is high in Omega-6s, sure, but walnut oil isn’t something you’re going to use every day, or even every week. ..

23% MUFA
53% Omega-6 PUFA
10% Omega-3 PUFA
9% SFA

Macadamia Nut

…It’s also remarkably high in MUFAs and low in PUFAs, so it won’t throw your ratios all out of whack. ..

71% MUFA
10% PUFA
12% SFA

Sesame Seed

The premier “flavor oil.” Sesame seed oil, especially the toasted variety, offers an unmatched and irreplaceable flavor profile. Certain Asian dishes work best with a bit of sesame oil, but if you’re wary of using it over high heat (which you probably should be), you can always add it to the dish after cooking. Despite the high PUFA content, sesame oil also contains a ton of antioxidants that can help minimize heat oxidation. I wouldn’t use this more than semi-regularly, though. Good to keep in your pantry (or fridge), but not an everyday item.

43% MUFA
43% PUFA
14% SFA

Peanut

Restaurants like to tout that they use “healthy” peanut oil in their deep fryers. Okay, the relatively MUFA-rich peanut oil may be a better choice than corn or sunflower oil for high heating, but it’s still a legume (already off limits) oil prone to rancidity. In the UK, it’s known as groundnut oil. Avoid both.

46% MUFA
32% PUFA
17% SFA

Sunflower Seed

Insanely high in PUFAs with little to no Omega-3s to balance them out, sunflower seed oil is a pretty bad choice for sauteeing, baking, roasting, and even salad making. Trouble is it’s everywhere, and it has a reputation for being healthy.

19% MUFA
63% PUFA
10% SFA

Safflower

Like sunflower seed oil but worse, the oil derived from the “bastard saffron” is about 75% Omega-6 PUFAs with not a speck of Omega-3 in sight. It’s also lower in MUFAs and SFAs. What’s not to dislike?

14% MUFA
75% PUFA
6% SFA

Cottonseed

At least most of the oils I’ve mentioned come from technically edible plants, in some form or another. Cottonseed oil, however, comes from cotton. You know, the stuff that shirts are made of? Yeah. It’s everywhere, from margarines to cereal to shortening to frozen desserts to bread, because it’s cheaper than other oils (you can thank its status as one of Monsanto’s big four genetically modified crops for that) and it only needs “partial hydrogenation” to maintain stability. Luckily, that won’t be an issue for PBers who already avoid all that stuff in the first place. Warn your friends and family, though.

17% MUFA
52% PUFA
26% SFA

Grape Seed

Skip this stuff. It does have a buttery taste, and it gets a lot of hype as a worthy replacement for olive oil, but it’s got high oxidation potential, especially if you follow the recommended instructions and use it for deep frying or high heat sauteeing. It’s rather pricey, too, so there’s no good reason to use it.

16% MUFA
70% PUFA
9% SFA

Soybean Oil

Soybean oil is about as ubiquitous as corn and canola (again, thanks to Monsanto). ..

23% MUFA
51% Omega-6 PUFA
6% Omega-3 PUFA
14% SFA

As you can tell, seed and nut oils probably shouldn’t make up a significant portion of your diet. Some, like coconut, olive, macadamia, palm, avocado, and fish, are great, but the vast majority of oils are unnatural and way too high in PUFAs. And just remember, with some of the more questionable/borderline oils, a little bit goes a long way.” Again thanks to Mark Sisson for the walk through the oil aisle!

Notes:

wikipedia.org

Loren Cordain, Ph.D.

PāNu

Evelyn Tribole, MS, RD

UMMC

WestonAPriceFoundation

Marks Daily Apple

Krispin.com